Posts Tagged ‘pirapitinga’

Fish of the Week – Piranha

May 23, 2011
Pacu

This Brazilian Pacu took a "bread fly" (spun deer hair, cut and trimmed to look a piece of floating bread) in moving water, just like a trout sipping a dry fly.

Our “Fish of the Week” is Piranha … yes, the same one you hear about in fantasy horror scenarios and made famous by movies such as Piranha. Don’t run for land just yet, though – these creatures, like many portrayed in Hollywood and science fiction, aren’t nearly as fearsome as they seem; in fact, they’re rather fascinating to study and observe.

Piranha are members of the subfamily Serrasalminae, within which are also included Pacu. They are distinguished by their very different teeth. Throughout the Amazon, the name pacu has been given to a range of flattened, rounded fish from primarily the genera of Mylossoma, Myleus and Metynnis. Pacu, like their larger cousins tambaqui and pirapitinga, favor a vegetarian lifestyle; however, that doesn’t mean they can’t be convinced to join in on a little sportfishing activity from time to time.

Several species can be pursued with light tackle and will put up an impressive fight. Ultralight spinning rods that can deliver a kernel of corn or a wadded piece of bread can divert these little guys from their typical afternoon snack. Fly casters should use 2/0 Clousser Minnows and especially fruit-colored Glo Bugs dead-drifted in trout/salmon fashion.

Piranha

Piranha

There are at least 20 species of piranha (Serrasalmus sp.) swimming the rivers of the Amazon basin. Some grow larger than 8 pounds and can make for excellent light tackle action, especially on smaller spinning/casting rods or a 5-6 weight fly rod. Examination of piranha stomach contents show that their typical diet consists of about 1/2 fish while the other half includes fruit, seeds and bottom detritus. Piranhas are not picky eaters and will hit literally anything resembling a baitfish, such as a small Rat-L-Trap tipped with meat. If you’re not fishing for them, however, they can be quite a nuisance, as they have a habit of destroying your lures or that custom-tied $8 streamer the second it hits the water. Definitely use a wire leader to minimize damage to your line and be careful when removing the hook from their snapping jaws. While we are strictly a catch and release operation, these little guys do taste very good pan-fried.

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Peacock Bass Fishing Trip Finder

May 19, 2011

Make your dream of fishing for peacock bass a reality – we have many fishing trips available, including several openings in September and October. We promise it’ll be the fishing trip of a lifetime – and it’s affordable, too!

For more information on available trips, please visit our Trip Finder. Here, you can search for trips by accommodation (Blackwater Explorer Yacht, Floating Bungalow Camps, Elegant Rustic Lodge, Safari Style Camping, Exploratory Trips), by species (Bicuda, Catfish, Dorado, Payara, Peacock Bass, Pirapitinga, Tarpon, Trairao) and by calendar (all 12 months of the year).

Blackwater Explorer

Enjoying happy hour after a long day of fishing on the Blackwater Explorer, the beautiful air-conditioned vessel on which we often fish.

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Sign the Earth Day Petition

April 17, 2011

From The Nature Conservancy, a wonderful organization whose mission is to preserve the plants, animals and natural communities that represent the diversity of life on Earth by protecting the lands and waters they need to survive:

About this Petition:

Sign this petition to encourage others and join us as we celebrate the planet we live on, the food it provides and the people we share it with. Picnic for the Planet will be the world’s largest virtual picnic – and you are invited! Choose a favorite outdoor location, round up some friends and take the planet out to lunch! http://earthday.nature.org

The Desired Outcome of this Petition:

To protect the lands and waters we rely on for survival…for our food. One of the most direct ways you can help achieve this outcome is by changing your individual impact on the planet through simple actions like eating more sustainably and greening your diet.

Sign the Earth Day Petition

Meanwhile, here’s a big Pirapitinga caught on an Acute Angling trip for your Sunday viewing pleasure:

Pirapitinga

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The Amazon Fishing Season is Underway

September 6, 2009

Acute Angling’s Amazon Fishing Season is Underway for 2009 /2010

Every March, when the peacock bass fishing season winds down, I head home from the Amazon, always happy to return to New Jersey. After six months in the jungle, I’ve missed my family, missed the comforts of home and, dare I say it, even grown a bit tired of Brazilian beer. I welcome the leisure to enjoy pleasant dinners with my wife; to reconnect with my neighborhood, my friends and the fishes of my home waters. It’s always good to get back in time to enjoy the sense of renewal brought by the advent of spring and then stretch out in the comfortable lazy days of summer. Ah, but every September, as the weather begins to feel like autumn at home and the waters begin to recede in the Amazon, a new fishing season looms into view. I become helplessly reenergized with the excitement of starting off again, exploring new waters and fighting new fish. It seems that every year, the Amazon’s magnetic pull becomes greater and greater as the days get shorter and shorter.

The Blackwater Explorer Yacht

The Blackwater Explorer Yacht

As September rolls around and Americans get ready for the Labor Day holiday and kids get ready to go back to school, I’m getting ready to head off on the Blackwater Explorer yacht and get Acute Angling’s new season underway. We’re going to start off with a bang this year, taking our beautiful Amazon yacht into waters she’s never visited, in search of fishes we’ve not often pursued.

Arapaima - An Amazon Giant

Arapaima - An Amazon Giant

Rio Solimoes Exploratory – We’re starting this season with an exploratory voyage into Brazil’s vast western Amazon hinterlands. For the first time, we’ve organized a single three-week long voyage up the Rio Solimoes on the Blackwater Explorer. We’ll cruise from river to river in the complex flood-plain region. We’ll pursue acrobatic apapa (sardinata), enormous pirarucu (arapaima), fruit-eating tambaqui and pirapitinga, silvery matrinchá, explosive peacock bass, giant Amazon catfish and other fierce fishes of the Amazon. We’ll wander where we choose to and we’ll stop where the fishing is good until the three weeks are done. We hope to learn enough about this enormous region to offer our clientele new access to new species and an altogether new angling experience.

The Pirapitinga - A bruising fighter.

The Pirapitinga - A bruising fighter.

To make this limit-stretching exploration even more interesting, we’ve got a boatload of fish-crazed anglers aboard, including a core cadre of Amazon-hardened Aussies and several adventurous South Africans. This group of intrepid explorers comes complete with a fishing writer and a camera crew, so we’re prepared to document what we experience and then report back to our readers and anglers later this fall. We think it will be a stupendous voyage and we look forward to sharing the details with you.

Rio Madeira basin peacock bass – Later during September, we’ll head back east along the Amazon and into the prolific peacock bass regions of the lower Rio Madeira. Preserved in an Indian reservation, the lagoon studded rivers in this exclusive fishery produce huge numbers of big peacock bass every season. Last year, during our four week sojourn here, 41 anglers caught an incredible total of 11,601 peacock bass ranging up to 22 pounds. Think of it, that’s an average of almost 300 fish each, almost 50 fish per day for every angler! With waters dropping rapidly from this year’s record flood season, we expect to find perfect conditions upon our arrival. Perhaps we can even better last season’s remarkable statistics. If you’ve ever considered an Amazon peacock bass fishing trip, this is the best place to start and the Blackwater Explorer is the best way to get there.

When October winds down, and optimal water levels begin to shift with the season, the Blackwater Explorer will head north. We’ll fish the Rio Negro basin and its many renowned tributaries, such as the Rio Unini and the Rio Urubaxi. Meanwhile, I’ll head home for awhile to regroup and report back on our early season adventures. Watch this spot for reports on where we’ve been and where we’re going – as soon as I can get myself to an internet connection. Come November, I’ll be back in the jungle again as Acute Angling moves into other exciting regions like Brazil’s Guyana Shield and the Rio Branco basin. We’ve got two more exciting exploratory trips planned in our ongoing quest to explore yet more new fishing opportunities. You can learn more about where we’re headed by looking at our 2009 / 2010 fishing schedule. Or better yet, come with us! There’s an awful lot of fishing left to be done before March rolls around ….. and someone’s got to do it!

Visit us at;  www.acuteangling.com

Follow us on Twitter at;  http://twitter.com/PeacockBass

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wnzi3Skwi9M