Archive for April, 2011

Friday Lunch Break: Bill Dance Bloopers

April 29, 2011

Enjoy some laughs on your Friday lunch break with some classic Bill Dance bloopers …

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The Black Water Explorer – Amazon Peacock Bass Fishing

April 28, 2011

In this episode, world champion peacock bass angler Steve Townson joins Jenny Reiss of Acute Angling on a Black Water Explorer yacht trip.

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Fish of the Week: Catfish – Ariidae

April 25, 2011

We like to cover as many different species of Amazon fish in our “Fish of the Week” feature, even those that aren’t of much angling interest. To that note, our “Fish of the Week” is Catfish – Ariidae, which are absent from the waters generally of interest to Amazon anglers. These medium- to large-sized, world-wide, marine catfishes are parental caregivers, with males commonly protecting eggs and young in their mouths. Some species move into brackish or fresh waters but generally don’t come in contact with Amazon anglers.

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Fish of the Week – Dorado

April 18, 2011

Our “Fish of the Week” is dorado, which are migratory gamefish that look similar to saltwater dolphin fish and mahi mahi, albeit not related. Physically, dorado might be described as a prehistoric golden trout or salmon with the jaws of a pit bull terrier. Ichthyologists originally gave dorado the Latin name “Salminus maxillosus” – Salminus meaning trout-like and maxillosus referring to dorado’s incredibly powerful jaws.

As gamefish, dorado are hard-hitting, incredibly strong, acrobatic fighters that can weigh in at more than 30 pounds. Dorado are often found in a massive watershed between southern Brazil/Bolivia and northern Argentina – specifically, the largest populations are found in northern Argentina, Paraguay, Southern Brazil and Bolivia. Surprisingly, dorado are a relatively little known gamefish outside of South America.

If you fish for peacock bass in the Amazon, then you’re in luck – conventional dorado gear and tackle is basically the same as peacock bass. Wire leaders are essential, and because dorado aren’t usually surface fish, the most productive gear are typically medium jerk baits, Rattle Trap-type lures, spoons and jigs. Dorado are often fished with an 8-9 weight fly rod and either a 200-grain, 24-foot sink tip line or a full floating line depending upon water conditions. Use a heavy steel leader, not mono line, as dorado chew right through it. Dorado are attracted to a variety of streamers, sliders and Atlantic salmon-style bombers during ideal conditions (all on 4/0 heavy, long shank hooks).

Dorado

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Sign the Earth Day Petition

April 17, 2011

From The Nature Conservancy, a wonderful organization whose mission is to preserve the plants, animals and natural communities that represent the diversity of life on Earth by protecting the lands and waters they need to survive:

About this Petition:

Sign this petition to encourage others and join us as we celebrate the planet we live on, the food it provides and the people we share it with. Picnic for the Planet will be the world’s largest virtual picnic – and you are invited! Choose a favorite outdoor location, round up some friends and take the planet out to lunch! http://earthday.nature.org

The Desired Outcome of this Petition:

To protect the lands and waters we rely on for survival…for our food. One of the most direct ways you can help achieve this outcome is by changing your individual impact on the planet through simple actions like eating more sustainably and greening your diet.

Sign the Earth Day Petition

Meanwhile, here’s a big Pirapitinga caught on an Acute Angling trip for your Sunday viewing pleasure:

Pirapitinga

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Amazon World Records

April 15, 2011
It’s no secret to us that the Amazon holds the biggest exotic gamefish you can find, as evidenced by our numerous record catches over the years (detailed below). Can you imagine what strength it took to bring in that 295 pound Piraiba catfish or that 109 pound Jau? (Both of which, incidentally, were caught by Russell Jensen – you can view a video montage of his record catches with Acute Angling at the bottom of this entry.)

We’re often asked, “Where are the biggest fish located and why?” To put it simply, you’ll find the biggest fish, particularly peacock bass, only in the Amazon basin. The IGFA all tackle record for Cichla temensis (the largest of the peacock bass genus) is 27 pounds, and they often weigh in over 20 pounds. These trophy fish can’t thrive in waters that go below 72 degrees, so you’ll find them in the tributaries of the Rio Negro, Rio Orinoco, Rio Branco and some tributaries of the Rio Madeira and not in Peru, Bolivia, Florida or anywhere else.

Acute Angling’s Amazon Exotic Species records with IGFA
Species Scientific Name Weight Angler Trip Year Type Status
Pescada Plagioscion squamosissimus 11 lbs. 4 oz. Russell Jensen Rio Travessao 2009 AT* Current
Piranha Serrasalmus rhombeus 7 lb and up Russell Jensen Rio Travessao various AT Past
Piranha Serrasalmus rhombeus 8 lbs. 7 oz. Russell Jensen Rio Travessao 2008 AT Current
Apapa Pellona castelnaeana 7 lb. 0 oz. Paul Reiss Rio Caura 2003 LC* Past
* Note –     A T = All Tackle Record      LC = Line Class Record

Acute Angling’s Amazon catfish records with IGFA
Species Scientific Name Weight Angler Trip Year Type Status
Piraiba Brachyplatystoma filamentosum 295 lb. 8 oz. Russell Jensen Rio Travessao 2007 AT* Current
Jau Zungaro zungaro 109 lb. Russell Jensen Rio Urariquera 2005 AT Current
Jundia Leiarius marmoratus 25 lb. 12 oz. Russell Jensen Rio Travessao 2008 AT Past
Jundia Leiarius marmoratus 28 lb. 11 oz. Russell Jensen Rio Travessao 2009 AT Current
Redtail Phractocephalus hemioliopterus 70 lb. 8 oz. Paul Reiss Rio Alegria 2003 LC* Past
Redtail Phractocephalus hemioliopterus 16 lb. 6 oz. Russell Jensen Rio Urariquera 2005 LC* Past
Jandi Rhamdia sebae 9 lb. 8 oz. Russell Jensen Rio Urariquera 2003 AT Current
* Note –     A T = All Tackle Record      LC = Line Class Record

Acute Angling’s Amazon catfish record with the Fresh Water Fishing Hall of Fame
Species Scientific Name Weight Angler Trip Year Status
Jundia Leiarius marmoratus 23 lb. 8 oz. Larry Larsen Rio Travessao 2008 Current

Russell Jensen’s video montage of record fish caught with Acute Angling:

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The Fish Finder Answers Back with a Trophy Peacock Bass

April 14, 2011

World champion peacock bass angler Steve Townson joins Jenny Reiss of Acute Angling on a Blackwater Explorer trip. In this episode Steve makes a comeback in an unspoken competition with Jenny. He answers back by catching the biggest fish of the day.

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Take Me Fishing

April 13, 2011

Classic commercial part of the “Take Me Fishing” campaign, which encourages participation in recreational boating and fishing as well as generates awareness about the conservation of natural aquatic resources.

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Hammerhead Attacks a Tarpon

April 12, 2011

An incredible video …

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Fish of the Week: Peacock Bass – Cichla Thyrorus

April 11, 2011

Our “Fish of the Week” is Peacock Bass – Cichla thyrorus, one of the newly described (2006) species of Cichla. Unfortunately, due to the newness of this classification, there aren’t any photos of live specimens currently available. If you have photos, we’d love to see them – email Paul Reiss and we’ll credit you on our website.

The Cichla Thyrorus begins its life with vertical bar markings that are replaced by ocellated blotches as it matures into an adult. Other distinct marketings include the fish’s blotchy cheeks. Its depth-to-length ratio is approximately 29 percent, while it has approximately 83 lateral line scales. Similar species include most other peacock bass – Cichla pinima, Cichla temensis, Cichla vazzoleri and Cichla jariina.

Again, due to Cichla thyrorus’s very recent classification, not much is known about its angling “vitals.” What we do know, however, is that it can be found in The Rio Trombetas and Cachoeira Porteira in Brazil, specifically upstream of the waterfall. If you have any more information about fishing for Cichla thyrorus, please contact us.

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